Field Seed Planting Chart

Cool Season Forages and Crops

KindLbs/BushelPlanting Rate, Lbs/Ac BroadcastPlanting DepthPlanting DatesAdaptationComments
Barley4875-80, or drill 65-751-2″Sept-OctSoils with high pH; sensitive to acidic soilsMakes good quality feed grain and forage. Of the cereal grains, most tolerant to saline and alkaline soils. Not adapted to very sandy soils.
Clover, Arrowleaf608-10 ¼-½”Sept-Oct*Sandy loam soils, pH 6.0-7.0, good drainageGood cold tolerance. Latest maturing annual clover with growth into mid-June under good moisture conditions. Good reseeding potential. Low bloat potential.
Clover, Ball602-3 ¼” Sept-Oct*Loams and clays, pH 6.5-8.5, fair drainageGood cold tolerance. Late maturing annual clover with most of production in April and May. Good reseeding potential. Medium bloat potential.
Clover, Berseem 6012-16 ¼-½” Sept-Oct* Loams and clays, pH 6.5-8.5, poor drainagePoor cold tolerance. Does best in creek and river bottoms. Poor reseeding potential. Low bloat potential.
Clover, Crimson 60 16-20 ¼-½”Sept-Oct* Sandy loams and clays, pH 6.0-7.0, good drainageGood cold tolerance. Excellent reseeding vigor, but low percentage of hard seed. Best early forage production of the annual clovers. Earliest maturing clover.
Clover, Red6010-12¼-½”Sept-Oct*Loams and clays, pH 6.5-8.0, good drainageGood cold tolerance. Weak perennial. Spring growth begins later and continues longer than the annual clovers. Upright growth for good hay. Late growth causes it to compete with perennial warm-season grasses.
Clover, Rose6012-16¼-½”Sept-Oct*Loams, clays, and sandy soils, pH 6.0-8.0, good drainageGood cold tolerance. Good reseeder, but seedling vigor is poor. 
Clover, Subterranean 60 16-20 ¼-½”Sept-Oct* Loams and clays, pH 6.0-7.3, fair drainageFair cold tolerance, poor drought tolerance. Tolerates close grazing because of low growth habit. 
Clover, White603-4¼”Sept-Oct*Loams and clays, pH 6.0-7.5, poor drainageGood cold tolerance. Excellent reseeder. Does best in creek and river bottoms. Slow initial growth.
Clover, White Ladino601-4¼”Sept-Oct*Loams and clays, pH 6.0-7.5, poor drainageLarger, more robust type of white clover. Good cold tolerance. Does best in creek and river bottoms. Slow initial growth.
Oats, Winter3275-85, or drill 65-751-2″Sept-OctWidely adapted. Many varieties available with different characteristics (cold tolerance, seed yield, forage production). Excellent and highly palatable hay and forage for livestock and deer. Fair tolerance to wet soils.
 Peas, Field (Austrian Winter)  6040-50, or drill 30  ½-1″Sept-OctWidely adapted. Best in well-drained soils.Good cold tolerance. Excellent soil builder. High protein hay or forage for livestock and deer.
 Pea, Singletary (Roughpea) 55 15-20 ½-1″Sept-OctWidely adapted.Similar in appearance to vetch. Persistence is due to high percentage of hard seed produced.
Rape  3-5 ¼”Sept-OctWidely adapted.Good cold tolerance. Large leaves and stems. Nutritious and palatable forage for livestock and deer.
Rye56100-120, drill 80-1001-2″Sept-NovWidely adapted.Good forage and hay. Best cold tolerance of the small grains. Produces more fall than spring forage. Most productive cool season annual grass on soils low in fertility, well drained, and sandy.
Sweetclover, White (Hubam) 6012-16  ¼-½”Feb-MarLoams and clays, pH 6.0-8.0, good drainageGood drought tolerance. Produces tall, stemmy growth. Best for soil improvement, grazing, hay and honey production. White-flowered annual.
Sweetclover, Yellow Blossom (Madrid) 6012-16  ¼-½”Feb-MarLoams and clays, pH 6.0-8.0, good drainageGood drought tolerance. Shorter growth, more leaves, and finer stems than Hubam. Best for soil improvement, grazing and hay production. Yellow-flowered biennial.
Triticale 90-110, or drill 75-901-2Sept-OctWidely adapted. Cross between wheat and rye, combining the cold tolerance and disease resistance of each. May produce more forage than wheat or rye alone.
Turnips 3-5¼”Sept-OctWell-drained soil, pH 5.2-6.8Good cold tolerance. Produces large, bulbous root. Nutritious and palatable forage for livestock and deer.
Vetch, Hairy6020-25,or drill 15-20½-1″Sept-OctWidely adapted.Good cold tolerance. Good re-seeding/seedling vigor. Exceptional soil builder. High protein forage/hay.
Wheat, Winter6090-110, or drill 75-901-2″Sept-OctWidely adapted.Many varieties available with different characteristics. Good hay and forage for livestock and deer. Moderate cold tolerance, relative to the cereal grains. Better on wet, heavy soils than rye.

* May also be planted from February through early March. Early fall plantings are preferred over spring planting because of less severe weed problems and generally more favorable climatic conditions for seedling establishment.      

Cool Season Pasture & Native Grasses

KindLbs. per
Bushel
Planting Rate, Lbs/Ac BroadcastPlanting
Depth
Planting
Dates
Comments
Fescue, Tall2420-25¼-½”Sept-OctShade tolerant, deep-rooted bunchgrass.  2-4 ft tall.  Perennial if it lives throught summer.  Plant endophyte-free fescue for grazing.  Best on loam or clay soils.  Tolerant of wet conditions, but not flooding.
Ryegrass, Annual2425-30¼-½”Sept-Oct High forage producer; used either in pure stand or to overseed a warm season permanent pasture for cool season grazing.  Tolerant of wet conditions.  Adapted to wide range of soils.  
Ryegrass, Perennial2425-30¼-½”Sept-OctSimilar to annual ryegrass; will as act perennial if it lives through the summer. 
Tall Wheatgrass 10-15¼-¾”Sept-OctLate-maturing perennial bunchgrass.  Fair to good hay and forage production under irrigation.  Very tolerant of saline & moist alkaline soils.   

Wildlife Forages (See other tables for additional items)

 Kind Planting Rate, Lbs/Acre BroadcastPlanting DepthPlanting DatesAdaptationComments 
Alyce Clover15-20 ¼-½” Mar-MayNot sensitive to soil pH.Annual legume with fairly upright growth and relatively large leaves. Good summer browse for deer.
American Jointvetch (Aeschynomene)15-201-1½”Apr-MayMoist, fertile soils, tolerant of very wet conditions. Reseeding annual legume. 3-6 ft. tall. Excellent for deer, duck, dove, quail. Best in wet land subject to flooding.
Buckwheat50-601-1½”Apr-JulyWidely adapted.Annual. Produces abundant seed. Good for game birds and deer. Can be flooded. 70-80 day maturity.
Chufa 50 1½-2 Apr-JuneFertile sandy and loam soils.Excellent for turkey. The tuber (like peanuts, but with no shell) is scratched up and eaten. 100-120 day maturity. 
Chicory ¼-½” Sept-OctFertile, well-drained soils, pH of 5.5 or greater.Perennial herb. Good digestibility and mineral content. Utilized by deer and turkey.
Cowpeas 50-60 1-2″ Apr-JulyWidely adapted.Annual. High in protein and very palatable to deer; seed for quail. Summer plantings with available moisture.
Illinois Bundleflower ¼-¾” Mar-MayGood in loams and clays, fair in sandy soils.Native, perennial, legume. 3-4 ft. tall. Provides food and cover for wildlife. High in protein.
Lablab20-25 1-2″ Apr-MaySandy loams to clays, pH of 5-7.5. Good heat and drought tolerance. High protein. Row-cropping and protection during establishment recommended.
Lespedeza20-30½-1″Mar-MayAreas east of I-35. Tolerant of acidity and low Phos.Several different species. Good food and cover for quail and turkey. Plant in patches/strips near brush, woods and water.
Millet, Browntop25-30¼-½”Apr-JulyWidely adapted.Annual. 60 day maturity. 2-5 ft. tall. Excellent for all birds. Produces abundant seed. Reseeds easily and quickly.
Millet, Proso30-40 ¼-½”Apr-July Widely adapted. Annual. 3-6 ft. tall. Excellent for all game birds. Plants bend to ground as seed matures. 70-75 day maturity. 
Millet, Japanese25-35 ¼-½”Apr-SeptWidely adapted. Tolerant of flooding. Annual. 2-5 ft. tall. Excellent for all game birds, but best for waterfowl when flooded. 60-90 day maturity.
Partridge Peas10-15¼-½”Apr-JulyWidely adapted. Can be found growing wild. Annual reseeding legume. 1-6 ft. tall. Excellent food and cover for quail and other game birds. 110 day maturity.
Sesame 10-15 ¼-½” Apr-July Widely adapted. Best on fertile loams. Annual. 4-6 ft tall. Slowly shatters great quantities of oily seed. Excellent for all game birds. 
Sorghum, Wild Game Food (WGF)20-301-2″Apr-July Widely adapted. Annual. Birds will not eat the seed until it has dried. 3-4 ft. tall. 90-100 day maturity. 
Soybean, Laredo 50-60 1-2″ May-June Widely adapted; more productive on fertile loams. Annual forage-type soybean. Excellent spring/summer protein for deer. Good palatability. Birds relish the seed.
Sunflower, Maximilian3-4¼-½”Apr-MayWidely adapted.Can be found growing wild.Native, perennial. 3-9 ft. tall. Provides food and cover for all wildlife.
Sunflower, Native (Common)10¼-½”Dec-JulyWidely adapted. Can be found growing wild. Persistent reseeding annual. Excellent for all birds. High % of dormant seed. Best results when planted in winter. 
Sunflower, Peredovik (black oil)25-30½-¾”Apr-JuneWidely adapted; more productive on fertile loams.Annual. 4-5 ft tall. 100 day maturity. High oil content. Excellent for dove and quail; browsed heavily by deer.

Warm Season Forages and Crops

Kind Lbs/BushelBroadcast  Drilled In RowsPlanting
Depth 
Planting
Dates 
Comments
Corn, Field568-20  1-2″Mar-AprAnnual. Many hybrids available with different characteristics. Planting rates vary with seed size, desired population and row width.
Cowpeas6040-503015-20 1-2″Apr-JulyAnnual. Many types and varieties available. Used for hay, forage, wildlife, soil building, human consumption. High-protein forage.
Early Sumac (“Red Top Cane”)5075-8060-65  1-2″Apr-JuneAnnual. Seed is high in tannin and unpalatable to livestock. Crop needs to be utilized before seed is mature.
 Hegari56 85-9070-75  1-2″Apr-JuneAnnual. Useful as hay crop. Produces soft, white seed that is readily utilized by all classes of livestock.
Johnsongrass4025-3015-20  ½-1″Apr-July Perennial; extremely persistent and hardy. Highly preferred by livestock and an excellent forage; risk of prussic-acid poisoning and nitrate toxicity.
Millet, German Strain R (Foxtail)5030-4025-30  ½-1″May-AugAnnual grass. 1-4 ft tall. 75-90 day maturity. Makes excellent hay. Also valuable for erosion control.
Millet, Hybrid Pearl48 30-4025-30  ½-1″May-JulyAnnual that grows 6 ft. tall or more. Tillers profusely. Excellent high quality forage and hay. Does not produce prussic acid, but has risk of nitrate toxicity.
Mungbeans40-5025-3015 1-2″Apr-JulyAnnual legume. Tall growth with less leaf matter than Cowpeas. Very quick maturity. Good short season hay crop. 
Sorghum Almum4025-3015-20 ½-1″Apr-JulyAnnual. Natural hybrid between Johnsongrass and sorghum. Wider leaves and larger stems than Johnsongrass, but not as persistent. Risk of prussic acid poisoning and nitrate toxicity.
Sorghum, Hybrid Forage56 40-50 (Greenchop)20 (Ensilage)10-15 (Ensilage)1-2″Apr-JulyAnnual that grows 7-8 ft. tall. Good hay and forage. Good heat/drought tolerance. Risk of prussic acid poisoning and nitrate toxicity.
Sorghum, Grain (“Milo”)56 5-12 5-101-2″Apr-JulyAnnual. Many hybrids available with different characteristics. For grain and hay. Risk of prussic acid poisoning and nitrate toxicity.
Sorghum Sudangrass, Hybrid5660-8050-65 1-2″Apr-JulyAnnual. Many hybrids, i.e. late-maturing, photo-period sensitive and brown mid-rib. Used for hay and forage. Risk of prussic-acid poisoning and nitrate toxicity.
Soybean6050-6040-50 1-2″May-JuneAnnual legume. Available in forage or grain types. Many hybrids available. High in protein. For hay, soil-building, and animal feed.
Sudangrass4040-5030 1-1½”Apr-JulyAnnual. Many varieties available with different characteristics. Used for hay, and forage.

Warm Season Pasture and Native Grasses

KindPlanting Rate
Lbs/Acre Broadcast
Planting
Depth
Planting
Dates
AdaptationComments
Bahiagrass15-20¼-½”Apr-JulypH 6.0-6.5. Widely adapted, but best east of I-35. Deep-rooted perennial; forms dense tough sod. Used for forage and hay.
Bermudagrass8-12 Unhulled
5-10 Hulled
¼”Apr-July*pH 5.5-7.0 Widely adapted. Best on fertile well-drained soil.Long-lived perennial, sod-forming. Excellent drought tolerance and durability. Very persistent. Many varieties available with different characteristics (cold and drought tolerance, forage production).
Blue Grama1-2 pls¼”Apr-MayGood in loams and clays, Fair in sandy soils.Good drought and cold tolerance, fair salt tolerance. Native, perennial bunchgrass. 1-2 ft tall. Very palatable. Best west of I-35.
Bluestem, Big3-5 pls¼”Apr-MayGood in loams, fair in clays and sandy soils. Good cold tolerance, fair drought and salt tolerance. Native, perennial bunchgrass. 3-6 ft tall. Good and palatable forage producer. Excellent cover for wildlife.
Bluestem, K.R. (King Ranch)1-2 pls¼”Apr-MayGood in loams and clays, poor in sandy soils. Good drought and cold tolerance, fair salt tolerance. Introduced, perennial bunchgrass. Hardy. Quick growth, aggressive spreader. Not much value as forage or hay, and no value for wildlife.
Bluestem, Little 3-4 pls ¼” Apr-MayGood in loams, clays and sandy soils. Good cold tolerance, fair drought tolerance, poor salt tolerance.  Native, perennial bunchgrass. 2-4 ft tall. Good and palatable forage producer. Excellent cover for quail.
Bluestem, Yellow (Plains, WW Spar)  2 pls ¼” Apr-MayGood in loams, fair in clays and sandy soils. Good cold tolerance, fair drought and salt tolerance.  Introduced. Excellent forage and hay with good management.
Bluestem, WW B Dahl 1-2 pls¼”  Apr-MayGood in loams and clays, Fair in sandy soils. Good drought tolerance, fair cold and salt tolerance. Introduced. Excellent forage/hay with good management. Best south of I-20.
Buffalograss5-10 pls¼”Apr-MayGood in clays and loams, Poor in sandy soils. Good drought and cold tolerance, fair salt tolerance.Native, perennial that is low-growing and persistent. 
Crabgrass5 pls¼”Apr-JuneWidely adapted. Good drought tolerance.Good reseeder. Annual. Persistent. Valuable as a forage; highly palatable to livestock.
Dallisgrass10-15 pls¼-½”Apr-JulyWidely adapted. Good drought tolerance.Persistent, deep-rooted perennial bunchgrass. able to withstand wet soils.
Green Sprangletop2 pls¼”Apr-MayGood in loams and sandy soils, Fair in clays. Good drought and cold tolerance, fair salt tolerance. Native, perennial bunch grass. 1-3 ft tall. Good and palatable forage producer. Good cover and source of seed for wildlife.
Indiangrass3-4 pls¼”Apr-MayGood in loams and sandy soils, Fair in clays. Good cold tolerance, Fair salt tolerance, Poor drought tolerance. Native, perennial bunchgrass. 3-8 ft tall. Extremely palatable and highly preferred by livestock. Good cover for wildlife.
Kleingrass2-3 pls¼”Apr-MayGood in loams and clays, Fair in sandy soils. Fair drought and salt tolerance, Poor cold tolerance.Introduced, perennial bunchgrass. 3-4 ft tall. Excellent forage and hay with good management. Good cover and source of seed for wildlife.
Lovegrass, Weeping3-5 pls¼”Apr-JunGood in loams and clays; best in sandy soils. Fair drought, cold and salt tolerance.Introduced, perennial bunchgrass. Grows 2-5 ft tall. Used for hay and erosion control.
Sideoats Grama4-6 pls¼”Apr-MayGood in loams and clays, Fair in sandy soils. Good cold tolerance, fair drought and salt tolerance. Native, perennial. Medium-tall bunchgrass, 1½-3 ft tall. Good and palatable forage producer. Excellent cover for quail.
Switchgrass3-4 pls¼”Apr-MayGood in loams, clays and sandy soils. Good cold tolerance, fair drought and salt tolerance.Native, perennial. 3-6 ft tall. Good and palatable forage producer. Excellent cover and source of seed for wildlife

* Bermudagrass will germinate after soil temperatures reach 65º. However, unhulled bermudagrass can be safely planted prior to this and will germinate when soil temperatures reach the appropriate temperature.

Turf Grasses, Flowers and Ornamentals

KindPlanting Rate
Lbs/1,000ft²
Planting
Depth
Planting
Dates
Comments
Bermudagrass1–3¼”Apr-JulyWarm-season perennial. Widely adapted. Needs mostly to full sun. Excellent for erosion control, lawns and athletic fields. Ranges from Common to better turf varieties.
Bluebonnets1-2¼-½”Oct-NovNative, warm-season annual. Does well on slopes and soils with good drainage. Needs full sun. Plant in late-summer to fall for spring flowers. Scarification not necessary.
Buffalograss 2-5¼”Apr-JulyNative, warm-season. Good drought and cold tolerance, fair salt tolerance. Not adapted to sandy soils and high rainfall. Very low maintenance. Persistent. Slow growth rate.
Centipedegrass ⅛-1¼”Apr-JulyAdapted to sandy, acid soils of low to moderate fertility. Moderately shade tolerant, but prefers full sun. Not tolerant of heavy traffic. Forms dense turf. Relatively slow growth. 
Crownvetch ⅛-1½”Mar-AprPerennial legume. Used in erosion control and rocky conditions. Drought tolerant. Does well on all soils. Not tolerant of salt and alkali. May become invasive in turf situations.
Dichondra ⅛-1¼”Apr-JulyWarm season perennial. Low-growing, broad-leaved, carpet-like groundcover. Best in moist, well-drained soils. Fair heat and cold tolerance. 
Fescue, Tall 5-10¼”Sept-Oct*Cool-season, but will survive summers in shade under irrigation. Very shade tolerant. Used extensively in yards with too much shade to support other turf grasses. 
Prairie Clover, Purple ⅛-1¼-½”Mar-AprNative, warm-season, perennial legume. Drought tolerant. Used in reclaiming eroded and depleted soils and prairie reclamation projects.
Ryegrass, Annual10-15¼”Sept-Oct*Cool-season. Used extensively for erosion control and overseeding lawns and athletic fields. Fast rate of establishment. Fast growth rate and recovery after clipping.
Ryegrass, Perennial10-15¼”Sept-Oct*Cool-season. Although similar to Annual Ryegrass, it has shorter, finer growth and better wear tolerance. Generally makes better quality cool-season turf.
Zoysia⅛-1¼”April-MayWarm-season. Moderately shade tolerant. Good drought tolerance. Fair salt tolerance. Needs well-drained soil. Good traffic tolerance, but slow to fill in damaged areas.

* May also be planted from Feb-Mar. Ryegrasses will persist until approx. June/July, while Fescue will survive the Texas and southern Oklahoma region through the summer as long as it is irrigated often and/or in shady conditions.

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